Comments on records

ASTROLABE
John Davis wrote @ 16:25:01 @ 21st October 2012.

This item is NOT an astrolabe, it is an early nocturnal (probably 15 C or 16 C). Ownership has passed to me and it will be published in due course (as part of a larger study).

Comment entered on record: NMS-D40DC2 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Astrolabe
Broad Period: Medieval
County of origin: Norfolk

ASTROLABE
John Davis wrote @ 16:22:15 @ 21st October 2012.

This item is NOT an astrolabe! It has now been published: see J. Davis: 'A Medieval Gunter's Quadrant?', BSS Bulletin, 23(iii), 2-7 (Sept 2011).

Comment entered on record: NMS-AD1A34 Find on review
Object type: Astrolabe
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: Norfolk

SUNDIAL
John Davis wrote @ 14:10:55 @ 18th October 2012.

The first numeral would have been [V]III (ie eight) as the next is nine. The date is likely to be C17 or early C18.

Comment entered on record: SOM-86EAE4 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Sundial
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: Wiltshire

COIN
Mark Schollar wrote @ 19:32:44 @ 17th October 2012.

This is a continental porcupine sceat series E, reverse stepped cross. Type 53 N150

Comment entered on record: NARC2807 Find published
Object type: Coin
Broad Period: Early medieval
County of origin: Milton Keynes

SWORD
Dot Boughton wrote @ 11:47:12 @ 17th October 2012.

Hi Steph! Can you turn around the image, please, to make it the right-way up? Sorry for being narky - I am trolling the database for something totally different and stumbled across this again! Dot x

Comment entered on record: SUSS-761CD0 Find published
Object type: Sword
Broad Period: Bronze age
County of origin: East Sussex

TOGGLE
Dot Boughton wrote @ 10:16:19 @ 17th October 2012.

Hi, this is a toggle, dating from c. 100BC-AD100, see LANCUM-30FA31, where these toggles appear as centrepiece in a Late IA/Early Roman sword belt fitting.

Comment entered on record: LANCUM-1E7BE6 Find published
Object type: Toggle
Broad Period: Iron age
County of origin: Cumbria

SCABBARD
Michael Marshall wrote @ 23:27:56 @ 10th October 2012.

Hello, Just noticed this nice object. I am unsure of the scale but I wonder if this might be a type ii fittings which Ian Stead (2206, 52) regards as a possible LIA sword belt / baldric fastener. There is a close parallel from a burial at Owslebury, Hampshire (ibid, 247, figure 81, no 116c.) Ian Stead (2006) British Iron Age Swords and Scabbards British Museum Press

Comment entered on record: SUR-122628 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Scabbard
Broad Period: Iron age
County of origin: Surrey

CLOTH SEAL
Paul Cannon wrote @ 18:00:43 @ 4th October 2012.

The following link on a Dutch website is to one side of a more complete version of this seal. http://www.dutchartefacts.nl/?page_id=288&nggpage=3 See item number 30. It clearly shows that the three line inscription does read 14/NED/EL.

Comment entered on record: SWYOR-26BD08 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Cloth seal
Broad Period: Modern
County of origin: Lincolnshire

COIN HOARD
John Robinson wrote @ 16:45:07 @ 30th September 2012.

Are the weights correct?They are the same as the weights for the 2 coins in GLO-D827A1. The 0.46g looks very low for either coin. Also BIAC references relate to Dobunni F whereas 1 coin is Eisv, the other Dobunni B.

Comment entered on record: GLO-D8BCD6 Find published
Object type: Coin hoard
Broad Period: Iron age
County of origin: South Gloucestershire

TOKEN
Richard wrote @ 10:36:20 @ 29th September 2012.

This token of Henry Barnes has recently been re-attributed to Steyning, Sussex. and not Stevenage. See Ron Kerridges book on The Tokens, Metallic Tickets, Check and Passes of West Sussex

Comment entered on record: SUSS-C30B14 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Token
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: West Sussex

COIN
Carl Zipfel wrote @ 21:17:24 @ 28th September 2012.

The lack of a mint mark In Ex. is a clear indicator that this coin is from London. Based on a best estimate of the obverse inscription ( SEVERVS NOBILIS C) I would say that it is RIC VI London 063a. Carl Zipfel Coinproject.com LRB Moderator

Comment entered on record: CAM-59ABF1 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Coin
Broad Period: Roman
County of origin: Cambridgeshire

SEAL
Stuart Elton wrote @ 21:01:04 @ 27th September 2012.

These are the arms of the Russian City of Riga. See similar seal here:- http://www.bagseals.org/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=926

Comment entered on record: YORYM-E71464 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Seal
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: East Riding Of Yorkshire

COIN HOARD
Phillip wrote @ 21:20:03 @ 26th September 2012.

Lovely the Hoard was sold at Spink today and I purchased 2 coins from it to keep them together in my collection lovely.

Comment entered on record: DOR-A1CCB1 Find published
Object type: Coin hoard
Broad Period: Roman
County of origin: Dorset

SEAL MATRIX
Julian Watters wrote @ 16:54:39 @ 21st September 2012.

Do you think this might be 'Sohou Roben'? I've just spent hours deciphering one with this legend. There are a few on the db.

Comment entered on record: LEIC-C40761 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Seal matrix
Broad Period: Medieval
County of origin: Warwickshire

CLOTH SEAL
Paul Cannon wrote @ 22:16:52 @ 14th September 2012.

I believe this is one of the varieties of known cloth seals for the Dutch city of Haarlem. Only a small part of the crowned city arms is visible. Below the small cross potent would have been a vertical sword with mulletts (stars) either side. Confirmation of the origin of the seal is the fragmentary inscription which is part of [H]AE[RLEMS GOET]. There are numerous Haarlem seals on the PAS database. However most of them are not crowned. For a similar crowned seal see http://www.bagseals.org/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=3167

Comment entered on record: BH-1E6E41 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Cloth seal
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: Hertfordshire

MOUNT
Laura Burnett wrote @ 09:47:00 @ 14th September 2012.

There are several similar circular plaques on the system including BERK-F58E08, this record draws together useful references.

Comment entered on record: KENT-1CC062 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Mount
Broad Period: Medieval
County of origin: Surrey

SEAL
David Algar wrote @ 00:11:17 @ 14th September 2012.

This is an early 18th century seal. For another example see WILT AFD0C4, which I identified some years ago

Comment entered on record: SUSS-758286 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Seal
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: West Sussex

TOKEN
Paul Cannon wrote @ 20:07:54 @ 13th September 2012.

This is a Swedish 2 ore coin from the reign of King Karl XI.

Comment entered on record: KENT-FFF0E4 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Token
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: Kent

PERFORATED OBJECT
Graham Hill wrote @ 23:27:13 @ 11th September 2012.

I have seen the 3 cushion mace-heads on display at The Museum of London. They share a finish and form with this one; though slimmer in profile. There is matched pair, perfect in finish in black and white stone and one almost so in a green stone. This one shows slight manufacturing marks in the entrant to the shaft hole(A14578) with partial depth longitudinal striations around about one quarter of the circumference. This indicates to me a pecked from both sides hour glass pilot hole with reciprocating stick and cutting hard stone(flint?) grit or embedded flint pieces to widen to shaft-hole. You have at MoL a battle axe A14982 with slotted 2.5 ratio length to diameter plan perforation, explicable by this technique. I have reproduced those internal marks on slotted perforation greenstone objects.(Hill,Forthcoming)

Comment entered on record: LON-8DC9F7 Find published
Object type: Perforated object
Broad Period: Neolithic
County of origin: Greater London Authority

ADZE
Graham Hill wrote @ 19:46:06 @ 11th September 2012.

An oval plan hole might be demonstrable by drilling. Modern milling machines achieve this. Many commentators suggest that 'bow drilling' is used to achieve hour glass and shaft hole perforations. Oval plan holes in greenstone and granite are achieved by pecking an elongated pilot hole, then straightening the hour-glass with the reciprocating action of a long stick and grit or embedded flint. Experimental work done and to be made public(Hill).

Comment entered on record: CORN-30EF13 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Adze
Broad Period: Neolithic
County of origin: Cornwall

MACEHEAD
Graham Hill wrote @ 19:35:35 @ 11th September 2012.

Hour-glass perforations of 20mm and larger entrant diameter are convieniently and rapidly made in fine granite and greestone using similar hammer stones to those used to peck the exterior shape. Chisel flake tippped elongated pebbles or shock resistant chert fabricators; if this material is plentiful,work well. Their work can be distinguished from drilling by the flared, pecked entrant; the result of occasional mis-hits. Finishing towards shaft-hole is achieved with reciprocating sticks with grits , embedded or hafted flint or side-cutting fabricators.See PAS entries:SWYOR-D14397 and LIN-DE7E13. Rotating versions are seen on some fine shaft-hole axe-hammers. However even fine Maesmore mace-heads show 'relics' of pecked hour-glass perforations. See illustrations(Roe, 1968). I hope to make available my experimental work in this field. The thrust of my argument is that very few holes above 15mm diameter in Prehistoric Britain were pilot holed by 'bow-drilling' and often finishing to shaft-hole wasn't either.

Comment entered on record: CORN-BA5948 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Macehead
Broad Period: Neolithic
County of origin: Worcestershire

TOKEN
Paul Cannon wrote @ 21:12:16 @ 9th September 2012.

I believe that this is a 17th century 2 duit piece (an oord) of Friesland in the Netherlands. The obverse consists of the bust of a Frisian farmer with a sword on his shoulder between F - O (for Frisiae Ordines). The legend reads: NIS[I.DOMINV]S.NOBISCVM or one of similar variants. The reverse has a crowned shield with the arms of Friesland - a pair of lions passant. The legend reads MO.NO[VA.ARG.ORDIN.FRIS]or a similar variant. In some types this inscription also contains the date. The basic type of this coin was produced in several varieties between 1608 and 1649. Full details of all the varieties can be found on the Dutch website http://www.duiten.nl/ Click on 'De catalogus' on the left hand side and then 'Provincie Friesland'.

Comment entered on record: SUSS-1E3C44 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Token
Broad Period: Modern
County of origin: East Sussex

SCABBARD
Antony Dufort wrote @ 15:12:48 @ 9th September 2012.

In better examples of this type of chape, it is clear the knight is astride a horse with a large axe over his shoulder. The horse's head is in fact visible in this example on the extreme left side of the chape, though difficult to read.It is very elongated, and the horse's legs are very short!

Comment entered on record: BERK-2C6116 Find published
Object type: Scabbard
Broad Period: Early medieval
County of origin: Oxfordshire

UNIDENTIFIED OBJECT
David Williams wrote @ 11:34:40 @ 6th September 2012.

This is one arm of a pair of compasses of later post medieval date.

Comment entered on record: SUSS-E4D410 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Unidentified object
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: West Sussex

COIN
Siliquae wrote @ 06:40:30 @ 30th August 2012.

Hello It's certainly RIC1228d (a hook on the spear) just for fun Siliquae

Comment entered on record: NARC-1DCF45 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Coin
Broad Period: Roman
County of origin: Northamptonshire

COIN
Siliquae wrote @ 06:29:22 @ 30th August 2012.

Hello It's RIC VIII, 292 (RSC161). But if the mintmark is realy SCON (not PCON), it's the first time I can see the second officina models of this siliqua. Just for fun SILIQUAE

Comment entered on record: NLM-EC30B6 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Coin
Broad Period: Roman
County of origin: Lincolnshire

COIN
C GIBBS wrote @ 12:27:15 @ 29th August 2012.

HI, it amazes me as to how these coin types[crab bmc 2788 & 2789]can be attributed to belong to the durotriges tribe, I just dont believe that they were ever minted here in dorset by this tribe ,but were more than likely from somewhere around portsmouth or only peculiar to isle of wight..30 years of detecting in dorset along with severel other friends none of us have ever come across this coin type. we have found celtic durotriges hoards, star fish & staters with anomalies. this to me is sufficiant to say that they do not run concurrent with durotriges coinage.thankyou

Comment entered on record: CCI-681879 Find published
Object type: Coin
Broad Period: Iron age
County of origin: Dorset

BROOCH
Robert Collins wrote @ 22:23:52 @ 21st August 2012.

This looks more like an Anglo-Saxon small-long brooch without its head than a crossbow. Best, Rob

Comment entered on record: CAM-A46813 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Brooch
Broad Period: Roman
County of origin: Cambridgeshire

STRAP FITTING
Robert Collins wrote @ 16:28:47 @ 21st August 2012.

Many thanks for the comment, as the Roman attribution was clearly wrong, and this has been corrected.

Comment entered on record: NCL-B8A7A5 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Strap fitting
Broad Period: Post medieval
County of origin: East Riding Of Yorkshire

POINT
Kevin Leahy wrote @ 10:40:28 @ 20th August 2012.

Do any of these blades bear any traces of retouch? Are they obliquely blunted? If you still have access to them sections would be most useful.

Comment entered on record: BERK-AFCCA2 Find awaiting validation
Object type: Point
Broad Period: Palaeolithic
County of origin: Oxfordshire

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