Stirrup Terminals

Introduction

In the late early-medieval period, and early in the medieval period, certain stirrups were composites made of two metals: primarily iron, but with copper-alloy fittings.  At the end of the tread-plate, at the stirrup’s base, where it connected to the arms, there was either a connecting or applied copper-alloy ‘stirrup terminal’.

PAS object type to be used

Use STIRRUP

PAS object classification to be used

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Terms to use in the description

Solder may be found in the recessed reverse of a stirrup terminal for application (Williams 1997, 1).  Often decoration can be zoomorphic, in the form of a beast’s head.

Date

Ringerike-style decoration on certain examples helps place them in the early-mid 11th century.  Williams (1997, 2) dated other examples slightly later within the 11th century.

Examples

Late early-medieval to medieval stirrup terminals: Trilobate form (top, NMS-58D0B0); zoomorphic form (bottom left, HAMP-21CD7F); openwork crested zoomorphic form (bottom right, SF-1C05C2). Copyright: Norfolk County Council; Hampshire Cultural Trust; Suffolk County Council; CC-BY-SA licence)
Late early-medieval to medieval stirrup terminals: Trilobate form (top, NMS-58D0B0); zoomorphic form (bottom left, HAMP-21CD7F); openwork crested zoomorphic form (bottom right, SF-1C05C2). Copyright: Norfolk County Council; Hampshire Cultural Trust; Suffolk County Council; CC-BY-SA licence)

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Key references

Williams 1997